A-Pinene

The name gives this terpene away

Pinene is found in pine trees, and produces that same crisp, familiar scent. If you’ve ever felt your lungs open up when you take a deep breath of mountain air, or sensed a tickle in your nose when you smell fresh rosemary or dill, that’s all pinene.

There are two variations of this well-researched plant compound: alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, although alpha-pinene is typically more dominant in the cannabis plant.

Pinene has an assortment of beneficial effects. Studies have shown that both forms of pinene have potential anti-inflammatory, antiallergic and antimicrobial properties. One study even showed that pinene helped increase the memory and brain function in animals. Pinene is also believed to have anticonvulsant and gastroprotective properties.

Natural healers have relied on pine needles and pine tree sap for centuries. Anecdotally, pinene is believed to help ward off skin infections, soothe a sore throat, and act as a powerful decongestant. Pine needle salve can be used to help relieve headaches and sore muscles, or rubbed on the chest to help clear stuffy airways. It’s also a natural bug repellent!

Hungry for Terpenes?

Experiment with some of these pinene-rich ingredients:

  • Rosemary
  • Dill
  • Parsley
  • Nutmeg
  • Fennel
  • Sage
  • Pine Nuts
  • Juniper Berry

Pinene is found in pine berries